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Please Yield To Buses

YIELD TO BUSES BIG BOX ADEvery day, more and more people are riding Link Transit to get where they need to go. This means that along all our urban area routes, every few blocks a bus may stop to pick up or drop off passengers, pulling out of traffic when there is room to do so. Sometimes this is not possible depending on the configuration of the roadway and the width of the parking lane.

If you happen to be behind a bus when it is signaling to get back into traffic, we ask that you please yield to the bus. This allows the bus driver to safely merge back into traffic while maintaining their schedule for those riding the bus, and waiting further down the route for the bus to arrive on schedule. It only takes a few seconds for the bus to get moving again, and then everyone can continue safely on their way.

Our drivers and our passengers thank you for this courtesy.


People For People Now Operating Wenatchee-Quincy Route

People For People, a non-profit 501 (c)3 organization committed to serving people throughout Central and Southcentral Washington State, is now providing service between Wenatchee and Quincy.

A grant from the Washington State Dept. of Transportation has made possible a pilot program to provide one round trip each day between Wenatchee and Quincy. The morning trip departs Columbia Station in Wenatchee at 5:50 AM and arrives at Quincy Foods at 6:50 AM. The return trip leaves Quincy Foods at 3:00 PM and arrives at Columbia Station at 4:00 PM.There are stops in Rock Island, Starr Ranch and ConAgra. Connections to Moses Lake via Grant Transit Authority are available in Quincy. Here is the complete schedule.

To ensure seating, please call between 8:00 am - 4:30 pm at least one business day in advance: 1-800-851-4204 Ext. 555 or (509) 765-9249 Ext. 555 or Email:

This service runs seven days a week, excluding holidays. There is no fare on this service.


Take Your Bike With You! 

All Link Transit buses and trolleys are equipped with bike racks to make it easy to take your bike with you.This allows you to extend your travel past where the bus might take you, to use your bike for mid-day errands, or to return home at night. It is easy and there is no extra charge to take your bike.

Just a heads up though, the bike racks on Routes 20, 21, and 22 hold three* bikes, and all other routes hold two bikes. During the summer, there are often capacity issues, so it is best to try to board with your bike at the beginning of the trip, either at Columbia Station or at the other end, whereever that may be. BIkes cannot be brought inside buses, so please have an alternate plan in the event there is no room on the buses.

*There may be a trip sometime during the day on these routes where a bus with two bike capacity is used.

The racks are easy to load and very quick. For a short video on how to load your bike.


Nine Ways You Can Fit Transit Into Your Busy Life

We know that not many people are ready to permanently park their car and start using transit for all their travel. But here are a few tips that might help you loosen the grip on your steering wheel, and help you begin using transit every now and then. A little change by many can result in positive changes in carbon emissions, congestion, and quality of life.

Download the complete list by clicking here>> nine_ways

What Are The Real Costs Of Driving?

Do you know what it really costs to drive your vehicle to and from work every day? There are a lot more costs than gas and oil when it comes to vehicle ownership, such as depreciation, insurance, taxes, etc.  Even if you are a transit user, you are probably going to own a vehicle anyway, but you might be able to get more years out of your car or truck, or cut back your vehicle ownership from two cars per household to just one, or from two down to three. When you make these kind of cuts, the savings really start to add up.

The American Automobile Association (AAA) publishes a brochure on the cost of driving. You can download the 2009 Edition of this (the most current edition) by clicking here.

Balance the cost of riding transit at a few dollars a day (or less) against the cost of vehicle ownership, or at the very least, filling your tank week after week.